Two Texts, One Topic

Contributor: Jennifer Blanchard. Lesson ID: 13917

How many books have you read about your favorite topic? Being able to combine information from multiple texts on the same topic helps you learn even more. Discover how!

categories

Comprehension, English / Language Arts

subject
English / Language Arts
learning style
Auditory, Visual
personality style
Lion, Otter, Golden Retriever
Grade Level
Intermediate (3-5)
Lesson Type
Dig Deeper

Lesson Plan - Get It!

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  • Do you think you could guess the topics of the most popular children's books published in 2020?

Give it a try!

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  • Did you guess correctly?
  • Have you read a lot of books on these topics?

If a lot of books are written about video games, that would mean there are a lot of books about video games to read!

  • If you wanted to know everything about video games, would you read just one book or as many books as you could find?

Yes! The more books you read about a topic, the more information you will learn.

A topic is the main idea or theme discussed in a text.

There are usually many books about the same topics because authors:

  • often focus on different aspects or ideas
  • discover new information to share
  • can have different opinions and perspectives
  • write for different audiences like children or young adults
  • write about what interests them, and a lot of people are interested in the same things

As a reader, it is great to have a lot of texts (or sources) to integrate (or put together).

When using more than one text, it is important to follow these tips:

  • Pay attention to what is the same and what is different between the texts.
  • Write notes on the information you learn.
  • Decide which viewpoint or perspective you want to share.
  • Think about with whom you will be sharing your information.
  • Decide what information is the most important for what you want to share.
  • Only share the same information once. Don't repeat it, even if it is repeated in the texts you are reading.

For example, you are writing an essay on airplanes so you read two books about them.

While both books are about airplanes, the first book focuses on how airplanes were invented and where they were first made. The second book mentions these facts, but it focuses on how airplanes are made today.

You will need to decide what the point of your essay is before you can decide which information to include. Then, you will use more from the book that focuses on your point.

  • Got it?

Great! Then let's move on to the Got It? section.

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