Comparing and Contrasting Stories

Contributor: Stefani Allegretti. Lesson ID: 13879

In this lesson, you will learn how to compare and contrast two different versions of a famous story about three little pigs!

categories

Comprehension, Writing

subject
English / Language Arts
learning style
Auditory, Visual
personality style
Beaver
Grade Level
Primary (K-2)
Lesson Type
Quick Query

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:
  • Have you ever heard the story about the three little pigs?

In this lesson, we are going to compare and contrast two different versions of this story to see what is different and what is the same.

The story of the three little pigs is a fictional story.

A fictional story is one that is make-believe or not real.

Before we read the two different versions of the story about the three little pigs and compare and contrast them, we will need some helpful tools.

These tools will help us keep track of what is the same and what is different in each of the stories.

One tool that can help us keep track of the parts of each story is a T-Chart:

t-chart

This chart will help you organize the important information you learn in each version of the three little pigs' story.

You can make your own T-Chart using a piece of paper, a pencil, and a ruler; OR you can use the Three Little Pigs T-Chart found under the Downloadable Resources in the right-hand sidebar.

If you are creating your own T-Chart, label the first column with the heading "The Three Little Pigs" and the second column with the heading "The Three Little Javelinas".

The T-Chart will help you keep track of the answers to the questions below:

  • Who are the characters in the story?
  • Where does the story take place?
  • What did the three little pigs build?
  • What materials did each little pig use to build his home?
  • What happened to the first two little pigs and their homes?
  • What happens at the end of the story?

Alright! Let's read the first version called "The Three Little Pigs" by Joseph Jacobs.

Follow along with the read-aloud video below and remember to write down the answers to the questions in the first column on your T-Chart.

The story of the Three Little Pigs by Joseph Jacobs illustrated by Tomie DePaola from Rebecca Crough:

Great work!

Now, let's read the next version of the story called "The Three Little Javelinas" by Susan Lowell.

Remember, write your answers to the questions in the second column as you read and listen to the story in the video below.

The Three Little Javelinas by Susan Lowell, illust. Harris | Read Aloud for Kids | The Reading Booth:

Great job!

  • Did you complete your T-Chart?

Check your answers with the Three Little Pigs T-Chart Answer Key also found under the Downloadable Resources in the right-hand sidebar.

If you weren't able to answer some of the questions, it's OK! Just copy them down onto your T-Chart.

Great work!

There are things that are the same in these two stories and things that are different. A T-Chart helps us keep track of the details in each story.

Another tool we can use to see what is the same and what is different in these stories is called a Venn diagram:

venn diagram

The pink circle is for the details only in one story, and the green circle is for the details only in the other story. The purple circle is for the details that are the same in both stories!

Take a look at the completed Three Little Pigs Venn Diagram found under the Downloadable Resources in the right-hand sidebar.

Great work comparing and contrasting!

Now, move on to the Got It? section for some practice!

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