Multiples of Four

Contributor: Meghan Vestal. Lesson ID: 11321

If you know your two times table, you can easily learn your four times table. Interesting, yes? Can you figure out why that is? We have a song, an online game, a quiz, flashcards, and projects four U!

categories

Elementary

subject
Math
learning style
Auditory, Visual
personality style
Lion, Beaver
Grade Level
Intermediate (3-5)
Lesson Type
Quick Query

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Look at this chart comparing two times tables to four times tables. What do you notice?

2 x 3 = 6

4 x 3 = 12

2 x 5 = 10

4 x 5 = 20

2 x 8 = 16

4 x 8 = 32

2 x 10 = 20

4 x 10 = 40

What do you notice when you look at the chart?

Make a list of any unique patterns or observations you make. Hold on to your list. You will review it after you practice some of the times tables you have already learned.

So far, you have learned half of your multiplication tables! You can multiply by two, three, five, ten, and eleven. Let's review what you have learned by practicing a few problems. Write the answer to each problem on a separate piece of paper. When you are finished, have a teacher or parent check your work:

10 x 3 =

3 x 4 =

5 x 6 =

9 x 2 =

3 x 8 =

11 x 11 =

3 x 2 =

10 x 10 =

10 x 4 =

12 x 5 =

 

If you are still struggling with multiplying by any of these numbers, find the Related Lesson you need to review (right-hand sidebar) and practice before moving on with this lesson. The reason you are learning one set of multiplication tables at a time is because it can be overwhelming to try to learn nearly 150 multiplication facts at once! If you learn them little by little, you'll know them all in no time flat! Learning a set of 12 multiplication facts at a time makes it much easier.

In this lesson, you will learn the four times tables. Start by looking at the multiplication table below. The column and row of the four multiplication facts have been highlighted. Make a list of observations you make about patterns, repeated numbers, etc. Share your list with a teacher or parent:

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

2

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

3

3

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

33

36

4

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

32

36

40

44

48

5

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

6

6

12

18

24

30

36

42

48

54

60

66

72

7

7

14

21

28

35

42

49

56

63

70

77

89

8

8

16

24

32

40

48

56

64

72

80

88

96

9

9

18

27

36

45

54

63

72

81

90

99

108

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

110

120

11

11

22

33

44

55

66

77

88

99

110

121

132

12

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108

120

132

144

 

You may have noticed that in both the row and the column, the digit in the ones place of each number (including two-digit numbers) repeats in a pattern: 4, 8, 2, 6, 0. Did you notice this pattern when you first looked at the multiplication table? Find this pattern in both the row and the column and show it to your teacher or parent.

Next, look at the question from the beginning of the lesson. Did you notice a relationship between the two times tables and the four times tables? If you are uncertain, look at the complete list comparing multiples of two and four. Share your observations with a teacher or parent:

2 x 1 = 2

4 x 1 = 4

2 x 2 = 4

4 x 2 = 8

2 x 3 = 6

4 x 3 = 12

2 x 4 = 8

4 x 4 = 16

2 x 5 = 10

4 x 5 = 20

2 x 6 = 12

4 x 6 = 24

2 x 7 = 14

4 x 7 = 28

2 x 8 = 16

4 x 8 = 32

2 x 9 = 18

4 x 9 = 36

2 x 10 = 20

4 x 10 = 40

2 x 11 = 22

4 x 11 = 44

2 x 12 = 24

4 x 12 = 48

 

Did you notice multiples of four are always double-multiples of two? If you are unsure what 4 x 9 is, multiply 2 x 9 (18) and add the sum to itself (18 + 18 = 36). This is because four is twice the amount of two.

Try it with some small numbers to test it out. For example, 2 x 3 = 6. If we want to use this method to find the answer to 4 x 3, all we need to do is add 6 + 6, which equals 12. Look at the chart above; does 4 x 3 = 12? Try this trick together with your parent or teacher using a few more numbers! Then, add this trick to the foldable you have been creating. You can add this information under the "4" flap.

Now, let's practice the four times tables by listening to the song, 4 Times Tables | Kids Multiplication Song | Children Love to Sing. Listen to the song two or three times. As you start to learn the multiples of four, sing along with the song:

 

After you have listened to the song a few times, move on to the Got It? section to practice solving multiplication problems with four.

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