The Statue of Liberty

Contributor: Jodi Powell. Lesson ID: 10853

Who's the tallest lady you know? How do you present a 450,000-pound present? Watch and read informative online videos and articles and complete a worksheet on this amazing, eloquent national landmark!

categories

Social Studies

subject
Social Studies
learning style
Visual
personality style
Otter
Grade Level
Middle School (6-8)
Lesson Type
Quick Query

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Have you ever been to New York City? If so, you've probably caught a glimpse of the Statue of Liberty standing tall and proud. Do you know the story behind Lady Liberty? Let's find out where she's from, what she stands for, and why we should know about her!

 

The Statue of Liberty, a gift from France to the United States, stands on Liberty Island in the New York Harbor as a universal symbol of freedom and democracy.

Watch the following videos and read the articles to learn more:

The Statue of Liberty for Kids: Famous World Landmarks for Children - Free School


Have you ever actually been to Liberty Island? Maybe you been up to the top of the Statue! If so, you can relate to Oliva's experience in this next video, Statue of Liberty 4 Kids:

 

Here's a list of some fun facts about Lady Liberty:

  • When being created, the statue was worked on by a team of men for ten-hour days, seven days a week, for nine years.
  • The statue arrived in America from France in 350 individual pieces.
  • Visitors must climb 354 stairs to reach the Statue of Liberty's crown.
  • There are 25 windows in Lady Liberty's crown.
  • The seven spikes on the Statue of Liberty's crown represent either the seven oceans or the seven continents.
  • The statue is made of copper and is now green in color because of oxidation (a chemical reaction between metal and water) from evaporation of the seawater surrounding it.
  • The Statue of Liberty weighs 450,000 pounds.
  • Her nose is four feet, six inches long.
  • Her technical name is Liberty Enlightening the World.
  • The Statue of Liberty was the first thing seen in America by more than 12 million immigrants as they entered the country through Ellis Island.

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