Summarizing Nonfiction Passages

Contributor: Jessica Buch. Lesson ID: 10163

Have you ever asked someone how his or her day was and had to listen to a looooong story, wishing the person would just summarize? Learn the importance of summarizing by sticking to important facts!

categories

Comprehension

subject
Reading
learning style
Visual
personality style
Lion, Beaver
Grade Level
Intermediate (3-5)
Lesson Type
Skill Sharpener

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Have you ever asked someone how his or her day was and had to listen to a looooong story, wishing the person would just summarize? Have you ever wished someone would just tell you the short version of a story instead of reading the whole thing? Which story could be summarized like this: "Wicked step-sisters and step-mother try to ruin an orphaned girl's evening at the ball. Fairy godmother saves the day! The shoe fits and they live happily ever after!"?

Summarizing is something we do every day.

When someone asks us about our day, we probably say something like this:

"In the morning, I got up and ate breakfast. I started to study right away. I studied for a few hours, then had lunch and went outside. I practiced soccer and then had dinner. Mom and Dad let me watch TV and then I got ready for bed."

What did you notice about the summary?

  • Was every single detail included in the summary? Or only the major events?
  • Generally, to summarize, it's a good idea to look for only the most important points.

Continue to think about this by taking a look at Summarize 3rd grade, from Celeste Ward:

 

If you have a pretty good handle on how to summarize, continue on to the Got It? section to find the main points of a story.

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