APA In-text Citation Review

Contributor: Melissa Kowalski. Lesson ID: 11774

Stealing is wrong, even when you're taking credit for someone else's words. This is why citing sources in your writing is so important! Take this review to make sure you don't accidentally plagiarize!

categories

Writing

subject
English / Language Arts
learning style
Visual
personality style
Beaver
Grade Level
High School (9-12)
Lesson Type
Dig Deeper

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Do you remember the differences among summary from a source, a short direct quotation, and a long direct quotation, and how they are cited? Refresh and reinforce your understanding with this review!

In the previous Related Lessons in this APA In-text Citations series, found in the right-hand sidebar, you learned how to identify and correctly cite summary from a source, short direct quotations, and long direct quotations in APA style.

  • Summary from a source is when you put the main ideas of an outside source into your own words and incorporate them into your writing.
  • A short direct quotation is fewer than 40 words taken verbatim from an outside source.
  • A long direct quotation is when 40 or more words are used directly from an outside source.

Do you remember what two pieces of information are need to cite summary from a source, and what three pieces of information are needed to cite both short and long direct quotations? Tell your parent or teacher.

  • Summary is cited with the author's last name and the year of the source's publication in the in-text parenthetical citation.
  • Both short and long direct quotations are cited with the author's last name, year of the source's publication, and the page number where the quotation can be located in the original source.

To refresh your memory of methods for creating APA in-text citations, watch the videos APA In-text Citations (6th Edition) from The Albany State University Writing Realized Program, and how to do a block quote in APA from kennethnehrbass.

When you have finished watching the videos, discuss the following questions with your parent or teacher:

  • When are quotation marks not used around a direct quotation?
  • What piece of information always follows the author's name, even when the author's name is used as part of the sentence?
  • Where is the period placed relative to the parenthetical citation in a long or block quotation?
  • Why is the page number needed when citing a quotation?
  • What punctuation mark separates all of the information in a parenthetical citation?
  • What punctuation mark is used when citing two authors' names inside a parenthetical citation?
  • What phrase is used after an author's name to indicate that the source had six or more authors?

 

 

If there are any questions you can't answer, go back and watch the videos again to get your answers.

Once you've answered all of the questions, move on to the Got It? section to test your knowledge of APA in-text citations.

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