What Happened at Pearl Harbor?

Contributor: Meghan Vestal. Lesson ID: 11167

What is a hero? Unlike ancient myths, heroes are real people caught up in real events. History is best told by people who were there, so listen to and read about survivors of the Pearl Harbor attack!

categories

United States

subject
History
learning style
Visual
personality style
Beaver
Grade Level
Intermediate (3-5), Middle School (6-8)
Lesson Type
Dig Deeper

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Imagine you are enjoying a nice day by the water. It is a warm morning, and the sun is shining. All of a sudden, the sky is filled with foreign planes, and bombs are being dropped all around you. You do not know to whom the enemy aircraft belong, but you watch in horror as buildings and boats burst into flaming debris, and people all around you are losing their lives.

This is what Americans at Pearl Harbor experienced on the morning of December 7, 1941!

In the previous Related Lesson, found in the right-hand sidebar, you learned about why the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.

On a separate piece of paper, write a paragraph that explains why the Japanese attacked the United States, and why, in particular, they chose Pearl Harbor to attack. Read your paragraph to a parent or teacher.

In this lesson, you will learn about some of the key events and people who were a part of the attack. Start by examining "Pearl Harbor by the Numbers" (below) to get a sense of the damage that occurred:

Pearl Harbor by the Numbers

 

2,403 People killed

1,178 People wounded

350 Aircraft destroyed or damaged

19 Ships sunk or damaged

 

 

As you read these numbers, what emotions do feel? Discuss with a teacher or parent.

On Sunday, December 6, 1941, an American cryptologist, a person who studies and breaks codes, intercepted a Japanese message. In the message, Japanese military officials asked questions about the positions of ships stationed at Pearl Harbor. The cryptologist gave the intercepted message to a supervisor, who said they would take a look at it on Monday.

Unfortunately, Monday would be too late. Around 8:00 a.m., December 7, 1941, soldiers stationed at Pearl Harbor naval base awoke to explosions. More than 350 Japanese aircraft filled the sky, dropping bombs on the harbor. There were also 26 Japanese ships and 35 submarines involved in the attack. Their mission was to destroy the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

The Americans were completely caught off guard and unprepared for the attack. Despite high numbers of causalities and destruction on the American side, only 129 Japanese soldiers were killed, 29 Japanese aircraft were shot down, and 5 submarines sunk.

During the attack, all of the United States' battleships were destroyed. Of the battleships destroyed, the USS Arizona remains the most infamous due to the number of human lives that went down with the ship. Early in the attack, a bomb was dropped on the USS Arizona. More than 1,000 men were trapped inside the ship as it sank, making up half the deaths that occurred during the attack.

Today, the USS Arizona continues to sit at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as a memorial to those who died. Each year, hundreds of thousands of people visit the memorial. Learn more about the history of the USS Arizona and the men aboard by reading 5 Facts About Pearl Harbor and USS Arizona (Barbara Maranzani, History Channel). Which facts did you find most interesting? Discuss your opinion with a teacher or parent.

History is told best by the people who lived it. Watch a USS Arizona survivor share his experience aboard the sinking battleship in the video Donald J. Stratton, USS Arizona Survivor - The National WWII Museum Oral History (The National WWII Museum) (below). Make sure to pay attention to the pictures of the USS Arizona. Is the ship bigger than what you had pictured in your mind? According to Stratton, what was it like to be on the USS Arizona when the Japanese attacked? Discuss with a parent or teacher.

Donald J. Stratton, USS Arizona Survivor - The National WWII Museum Oral History:

 

While the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor caused mass damage and destruction, the Japanese soldiers did not fulfill their mission.

In the 1940s, airplanes were becoming more common in battle. Therefore, aircraft carriers had replaced battleships as the most important type of naval ship. While the Japanese managed to destroy all of the U.S. Pacific Fleet's battleships, they did not destroy a single aircraft carrier. The Pacific Fleet's aircraft carriers were all out at sea on the morning of the attack, and the Japanese could not find them. When the Japanese military leaders learned that the Pacific Fleet's aircraft carriers had not been destroyed, they became nervous. With the aircraft carriers still operating, they knew the United States would recover and strike back.

  • How might the outcome of the attack been different if the Pacific Fleet's aircraft carriers were destroyed? Discuss with a teacher or parent.

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor killed and injured thousands of Americans.

Continue learning about some of those brave American heroes in the Got It? section.

Elephango's Philosophy

We help prepare learners for a future that cannot yet be defined. They must be ready for change, willing to learn and able to think critically. Elephango is designed to create lifelong learners who are ready for that rapidly changing future.