A Book Is A Place for Questions AND Answers!

Contributor: Jennifer Blanchard. Lesson ID: 13513

Have a question? Most people find answers in a book. Did you know, though, that asking questions while reading a book is the BEST way to fully enjoy AND understand it? Learn how here!

categories

Comprehension, English / Language Arts

subject
Reading
learning style
Visual
personality style
Otter
Grade Level
Intermediate (3-5)
Lesson Type
Quick Query

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Watch this catchy video about questions and come up with your own answers!

Questions Start with These (song for kids about questions vs. statements) from Harry Kindergarten Music:

Okay, okay, you probably already knew all about questions.

  • So, what's next?

Keep reading, if you please!

Learning how to ask questions and find the answers to those questions in a book will help you understand what you are reading and get all that the author wants you to know from a text.

It also makes you more interested in and engaged with the book!

Sometimes you are asked questions when you are reading, but good readers come up with their own questions too!

You should be wondering and curious as you are reading.

Check out Asking and Answering Questions: Reading Literature from Teaching Without Frills:

As you have seen, there are different types of questions.

Most questions usually start with the same few words:

questions

Once you start questions about a book with those words, you can group them together in other ways too!

Using those words to start off questions, questions about books can be grouped in another way too:

Thinking Within the Text

Asking and answering questions that can be found directly in the words of the book.

  • Example: What did the author say on page 5 about the main character's feelings?

Thinking Beyond the Text

Asking and answering questions about what the text means by making inferences.

  • Example: What did the author mean by "She didn't feel as confident about her choice."?

Thinking About the Text

Asking and answering questions about what the author did and why.

  • Example: How did the author make the character's feelings clear to the reader?

Whenever you are asking and answering questions while reading, you need to look for text evidence.

Watch What is text evidence from Alaa Al-Din al-Aaraj:

When you are thinking within the text, you will look for evidence that directly answers a question.

When you are thinking beyond the text, you will look for evidence that supports an inference you make. The answer won't directly be there, but there will be clues that will help you come up with your own answer.

When you are thinking about the text, you will also look for evidence that supports an inference you make. The answer won't directly be there, but there will be clues that will help you come up with your own answer.

  • Are you ready for more?

Go to the Got It? section!

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