Writing Numbers: Hundred Millions

Contributor: Erika Wargo. Lesson ID: 12822

What is the highest number you can think of? A billion-gazillion? What's the biggest number you can write? Learning how to write large numbers is very important; you'll probably do it 1,000,000 times!

categories

Elementary

subject
Math
learning style
Visual
personality style
Otter
Grade Level
Intermediate (3-5)
Lesson Type
Skill Sharpener

Lesson Plan - Get It!

Audio:

Did you know that the sun's diameter, or distance across, is one million, three hundred ninety-two thousand kilometers? How would you write that number using digits?

Did you know that if you can name a number in the hundreds, you can name a number in the thousands, millions, and even billions?

A three-digit number, such as 345, has three place value spots. It has the ones place, the tens place, and the hundreds place. 345 would be read "three hundred forty-five."

A good way to help with writing and reading larger numbers is to break the number into smaller parts. Each group of three numbers repeats the same three place-value numbers: hundreds, tens, ones.

Sometimes, commas (,) are used when writing numbers in word form if the number is equal to or greater than one thousand.

As you watch Read Big Numbers, from Math Coach, notice how the numbers with commas are read:

 

After the video, discuss with a parent or teacher how you would read these two numbers: 894 and 146,935.

Now, look at the place-value chart below and notice when commas are used:

hundred millions ten millions millions
,
hundred thousands ten thousands thousands
,
hundreds tens ones
5 5, 4 7 9, 1 2 4

 

In the place-value chart above, you see the number 525,479,124. The place-value chart can help you read numbers.

Begin on the left-hand side and read the first three digits you see and what place value spot the last digit falls in: Five hundred twenty-five million,

Then read the next set of three digits: four hundred seventy-nine thousand,

Then read the last set of three digits: one hundred twenty-four. 

hundred millions ten millions millions
,
hundred thousands ten thousands thousands
,
hundreds tens ones
5 2 5, 4 7 9, 1 2 4
Five hundred twenty-five million, four hundred seventy-nine thousand, one hundred twenty-four

 

Now, read it all together: Five hundred twenty-five million, four hundred seventy-nine thousand, one hundred twenty-four.

Notice how only the place-value spots of the millions and thousands were read, not every place that had a digit. The comma does not represent the word “and” as the number is read.


Take a look back at the example at the beginning of the lesson.

Did you know that the sun's diameter, or distance across the sun, is one million, three hundred ninety-two thousand kilometers? How would you write that number using digits?

Use the place-value chart to help you. Most of the time when there is a comma in the word form of the number, there is also a comma in the digit form of the number.

There was one million, so the digit 1 is written in the millions place-value spot. 392 thousand is written, and since there were no hundreds, tens, or ones, place holder zeros are needed: 

hundred millions ten millions millions
,
hundred thousands ten thousands thousands
,
hundreds tens ones
    1, 3 9 2, 0 0 0

 

So, one million, three hundred ninety-two thousand is written as 1,392,000.

Discuss with a parent or adult how to write fifteen million, nine hundred thousand, six hundred two. Then, look at the place-value chart below to check your answer: 

hundred millions ten millions millions
,
hundred thousands ten thousands thousands
,
hundreds tens ones
  5, 9 0 0, 6 0 2

 

Next, you will practice writing numbers into the hundred million with interactive practice and games in the Got It? section.

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